Nigeria Shopping and Currency

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MONEY

Currency

1 naira = 100 kobo. Currency abbreviation: N, NGN (ISO code). Banknotes are available in denominations of 1,000, 500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5 N; Coins are no longer used.

There are plans to create a common West African currency, the Eco, but exact dates have not yet been set.

Credit cards

American Express, MasterCard, Diners Club and Visa are only partially accepted. Details from the issuer of the credit card in question. In general, the use of credit cards is not recommended due to frequent cases of fraud.
ATMs

ec / Maestro card / Sparcard

ATMs are available in larger cities, but they don’t always work. ATMs are often used for fraudulent purposes.
Attention: Travelers who pay with their bank customer card abroad and want to withdraw money should find out about the options for using their card from their bank before starting their journey.

Bank opening times

Mon 8 am-3pm, Tues-Fri 8 am-1pm.

Foreign exchange regulations

The import and export of the national currency is permitted up to N 5000, provided that the amount has been declared upon entry. The import and export of foreign currencies is unrestricted and must be declared from an equivalent value of 5,000 US dollars.

Currency Exchange

The Nigerian government has set a very high exchange rate for the naira. Nevertheless, money should only be exchanged at official exchange offices and at official rates. Changing money on the black market is dangerous and can lead to arrests. It is advisable to bring US dollars in cash.

LANGUAGE

Overview

The official language is English in Nigeria, a country starting with N defined by COUNTRYAAH. The three main Nigerian languages are Yoruba, Ibo / Igbo and Hausa, with 400 other languages spoken.

Idioms

  • Goodbye = goodbye
  • Eight = Eight
  • Eighty = eighty
  • Exit = Exit
  • Beer = beer
  • Please = Please
  • Thank you = Thank you
  • Tuesday = Tuesday
  • Doctor = Doctor
  • Thursday = Thursday
  • Three = three
  • Thirty = Thirty
  • Entrance = Entrance
  • One hundred = one hundred
  • One = One
  • One thousand = one thousand
  • Friday = Friday
  • Five = Five
  • Fifty = Fifty
  • Danger = Danger
  • Closed = closed
  • Hello = Hello
  • Today = Today
  • Hotel = hotel
  • I feel sick = I feel ill
  • I don’t understand = I don’t understand
  • Yes = Yes
  • My name is?? = My name is??
  • I’m fine. = I’m very well.
  • Wednesday = Wednesday
  • Monday = Monday
  • Tomorrow = Tomorrow
  • No = no
  • Nine = nine
  • Ninety = ninety
  • Open = open
  • Restaurant = restaurant
  • Saturday = Saturday
  • Six = Six
  • Sixty = sixty
  • Seven = Seven
  • Seventy = Seventy
  • Sunday = Sunday
  • Menu = menu
  • Do you speak German / English? = Do you speak German / English?
  • Toilets = toilets
  • Four = four
  • Forty = Forty
  • Wine = Wine
  • How are you? = How are you?
  • How much is it? = How much does it cost?
  • Where is??? = Where is???
  • Ten = ten
  • Twenty = twenty
  • Two = Two

 

DUTY-FREE SHOPPING

Overview

The following articles can be imported into Nigeria duty-free (people over 18 years of age):

200 grams of tobacco;

1 liter of spirits and 1 liter of wine;

284 ml of perfume;

Gifts up to a total value of N 50,000 (excluding luxury items, photographic equipment, electronic devices and jewelry).

If the specified amount is exceeded, the total amount must be cleared. Antiques are only allowed by the Antiques Director

or a licensed dealer. Before exporting antiques, you must obtain a permit from the above-mentioned offices.

Prohibited imports

Beverages of all kinds (including beer, champagne or sparkling wine, mineral water, non-alcoholic beverages), food of all kinds (e.g. fruit, vegetables, grain, eggs), jewelry, precious metals and fabrics (including mosquito nets).

Note: Failure to comply will result in heavy fines or imprisonment of at least 6 months Note: Failure to comply will result in heavy fines or imprisonment of at least 6 months.

ECONOMY

Business etiquette

English is spoken in business circles. Business meetings often take place without prior appointment. However, when negotiating with government officials, it is advisable to make appointments in advance. Business deals usually only come about after lengthy negotiations.

Opening hours

Business hours: Authorities Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Private company: Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Muslim workers temporarily close their shops during prayer times.

Economy

Commercial department of the Nigerian Embassy
Rennweg 25, A-1030 Vienna
Tel: (01) 712 66 85/86/87.

Trade department of the Nigerian Embassy
Zieglerstra├če 45, CH-3007 Bern
Tel: (031) 384 26 00.

Federal Ministry of Commerce and Tourism
(see addresses).

Business contacts

Commercial department of the Nigerian Embassy
Rennweg 25, A-1030 Vienna
Tel: (01) 712 66 85/86/87.

Trade department of the Nigerian Embassy
Zieglerstra├če 45, CH-3007 Bern
Tel: (031) 384 26 00.

Federal Ministry of Commerce and Tourism
(see addresses).

SHOP

Overview

Popular souvenirs include Adure (patterned and indigo dyed fabrics), batik and ceramics from the southwest, leatherwork and Kaduna -cotton from the north and carvings from the East, spices, beadwork, basketry, ceremonial masks and traditional instruments. The design is very different depending on the region, many villages have their own characteristic style.

In recent years, more and more modern shopping centers have emerged in the country’s larger cities, in which internationally known brands are also sold. There are several shopping centers in the major cities of Abuja and Lagos, but shopping centers have also been opened in Calabar, Delta and Kwara, for example.

A particularly interesting shopping experience is a stroll through one of the many markets in the country, where you can trade. Above all, the Wuse Market in Abuja is well-known, where you can buy food such as fresh fruit and vegetables as well as electronic items, clothing, carpets and furniture. In the evenings, however, you should expect quite a large crowd. There are also specialized markets such as the Maitama Fruit Market, which sells almost exclusively fresh fruit and fruit juices, the Dei Dei Building Material Market, where building materials can be bought, or the Gudu Market, on which you can mainly find spare parts for cars. The prices in the markets are usually much cheaper than in the shops.

Opening hours

Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.-4.30 p.m. Many markets are also open in the evening.

Nigeria Currency