Serbia Cinema

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The generational change, with the emergence of new filmmakers, marked the first decades of the new century in Serbia. Emir Kusturica’s creative streak, after Život ječudo (2004; Life is a miracle), was not at the level of the past and at Zavet! (2007; Promettilo!) And Maradona (2008) was followed by a pause, interrupted by the short film for the collective film Words with Gods (2014). The other great, Goran Paskaljević, has made significant works on the country’s suffering. The metaphorical San zimske nuts (2004, A winter night’s dream) was followed by the grotesque and pessimistic Optimists (2006, Optimists), while the most relevant is Medeni mesec (2009, Honeymoons), two stories of couples seeking escape from Serbia and Albania. Paskaljević’s son Vladimir made his debut with the black comedy Đavolja varoš (2009, Devil’s city). An important exponent of the intermediate generation is Srdjan Dragojević, who shot Mi nismo andjeli 2 (2005, We are not angels 2) and the tragicomic Parada (2011; The parade): a criminal must protect the Gay pride in Belgrade in spite of himself. The most notable personality to emerge in this period is that of Srdan Golubović, son of director Predrag. In Klopka (2007, The Trap) a father makes a nefarious pact to save his sick son; Krugovi (2013, Cerchi), a complex story about the consequences of the war and memories that cannot be erased, is instead the proof of maturity. Golubović collaborates with the screenwriter Srdjan Koljević, himself director of the road-movie Sivi truck cervene boje (2004, Gray truck colored red) and of the historical film Branio sam Mladu Bosnu (2014, I defended the Young Bosnia).

Srdjan Karanović, in competition at the Venice Film Festival with the post-war fable Sjaj u ocima (2003, Sguardi d’amore), created Besa (2009, The Promise) in which an Albanian janitor, Miki Manojlović, takes care of the beautiful wife of the headmaster party in the war. After the documentaries on the protests against Slobodan Milošević, Goran Marković made Turneja (2008, Tournée), about a shabby theater company immersed in the absurdity of the conflict, and Falsifikator (2013, The falsifier). Exponent of the Black Wave, Želimir Žilnik instead devoted himself to the political-social documentary: Evropa preko plota (2005, Europe next door) and Kenedi se zeni (2007, Kenedi is getting married). Specialist in popular historical dramas is Zdravko Šotra: sue Ivkova slava (2005, The feast of Ivko) and Šešir profesora Koste Vujića (2012, Professor Kosta Vujić’s hat).

To the old guard belongs Miloš Miša Radivojević, author of Budjenje iz mrtvih (2005, Awakening from the dead), in which a writer returns from the grave to make up for lost time and do everything he could not do in life, and Kako about me ukrali nemci (2011, How the Germans Robbed Me). By Mladen Matičević to remember the documentary Kako postati heroj (2007, How to become a hero) and the thriller Zajedno (2011, Together), by Oleg Novković the solid Greek tragedy Beli, beli svet (2010, Bianco, bianco mondo) and Darko Lungulov the bitter comedy Spomenik Majklu Džeksonu (2014, Michael Jackson Monument). The screenwriter Dusan Milić has written the tragicomedy Jagoda u supermarketu (2003; Jagoda – Strawberries at the supermarket) and Guća! (2006, known as Gucha: distant trumpet), two young Roma in a Romeo and Juliet story during the famous Guća trumpet festival. Dejan Zecević: Cetvrti čovek (2007, The Fourth Man), Neprijatelj (2011, The Enemy) and Vojna Akademija (2013, War Academy) devoted himself to political horror. Very important documentary is Cinema Komunisto (2010) by Mila Turajlic, the history of Yugoslavia seen through Tito’s passion for cinema. Stefan Arsenijević made his debut with the choir Ljubav i drugi zloini (2008; Love and other crimes). Obični ljudi (2009, known as Ordinary people) has instead revealed the talent of Vladimir Perišić: a recruit is confronted with ferocity but the hope of a catharsis remains. Among the best debuts Klip (2012; Clip) by Maja Miloš, adolescent melodrama, and the provincial skaters of Tilva Roš (2010) by Nikola Ležaić. In Nicije dete (2014; Nobody’s son) by Vuk Ršu mović a boy raised among wolves returns to civilization, but the war brings him back. Adolescents between petty crime, absence of parents and nationalism in Varvari (2014, Barbari) by Ivan Ikić.

Serbia Cinema